Why Are So Many People Homeless in San Francisco?

Why Are So Many People Homeless in San Francisco?

Why Are So Many People Homeless in San Francisco?

Why Are So Many People Homeless in San Francisco? The question, now trending on Google, has left a fair amount of Americans looking to President-Elect Donald Trump to develop an economic resolution for California’s $400 billion-dollar crisis in unfunded liabilities and debts that has for far too long, had many Americans mired in poverty. 1) Economic News Release, Employment and Unemployment Among Youth Summary.

The kind of homelessness San Francisco sees is somewhat diverse — with supplementation and crisis homelessness that affects Syrian refugees in response to their migration. Then, there is inner-domestic “survival” homelessness, where individuals are homeless because they are searching for improved conditions. Whether homeless or displaced, no one would find it odd that the solution both groups desire, is shelter.

The majority of the homeless in urban areas are adult men of minority descent. In rural areas, however, the homeless are more likely to be Caucasian, and their genders and ages are less well known.

Why Are So Many People Homeless in San Francisco?

Homeless populations across the country.

With such a diverse population and no real way to keep tract, many wonder just how many people really are homeless or displaced in California. We know that no census manages to count every member of the population. Certain categories of people, such as Syrian immigrants and the “domestic dormant,” are the most likely to be missed and, therefore, undercounted and potentially underserved.

Jim Crow Economy

Oddly enough, others see 2016 homelessness as the dreadful in-law of Jim Crow — regulating the labor market to favor White people yet principally subordinating and disfavoring blacks. According to Drew Kiser, staff writer at the Advocate, Homelessness is often a race issue. In S.F., where African-Americans account for 7 percent of the population, they are disproportionately affected.

“black applicants are less likely to receive offers of affordable-housing offers than white applicants with worse credentials.”

“Just under 27 percent of African Americans in the city are homeowners, census data shows, compared with 36 percent of whites. About 28 percent of African American households fall below the poverty line compared with 8.6 percent of whites,” says staff writer, @JoaquinPalomino, at the San Francisco Chronicle.

Is gentrification to blame? Gentrification reduces low-cost housing and often place underprivileged Blacks and minorities at greater risk for homelessness.

“It’s like being out on the ocean, water water everywhere and none of it to drink.”

Frederick Jordan, president and CEO of San Francisco’s African American Chamber of Commerce.

The most recent tally shows them comprising 34 percent of the homeless population. And the history of systemic racism in America is to blame. Predatory and discriminatory loan practices and rental agreements have led to higher rates of eviction and homelessness. Even on the street, race makes homelessness even worse, as “black applicants are less likely to receive offers of affordable-housing offers than white applicants with worse credentials,” or job opportunities to support their families.

“It’s like being out on the ocean, water water everywhere and none of it to drink,” said Frederick Jordan, president and CEO of San Francisco’s African American Chamber of Commerce. “All of this wealth comes in and there are no jobs for us.”

Does Unemployment Contribute to Youth Homelessness?

What about the youth? What about those forgotten ones that operate on “street” usually targeting “hot spots” where adult homeless gather. Youth homelessness and poverty is among the most central problems of economics, and its alleviation is a long-standing challenge for homeless organizations, politicians, economists, and policy-makers alike.

Whites had the highest youth labor force participation rate in July 2016 at 62.7 percent. The rate was 53.8 percent for Blacks, 43.1 percent for Asians, and 56.2 percent for Hispanics. The rate for Blacks declined by 2.6 percentage points from last July, while the rates for Whites, Asians, and Hispanics showed little or no change.

The July 2016 unemployment rates for young men (12.0 percent), women (10.8 percent), Whites (9.9 percent), Blacks (20.6 percent), Asians (10.0 percent), and Hispanics (11.3 percent) also showed little or no change from last July. See table 2. 2) http://www.bls.gov/news.release/youth.t02.htm

Approximately 564,708 people in the United States will meet criteria for homelessness on a given night.  Around 2.5 million affected by homelessness are children. It is estimated that 795 people per 100,000 in San Francisco, are residents that will experience homelessness.

A Shift in Thinking

San Francisco continues to be one of the most expensive places to live in the country. According to real estate site Zillow, part of the problem is that San Francisco has failed to build enough housing to meet the current demand, sending home prices and rents up.

San Francisco should shift its thinking on poverty with a deeper theoretical understanding of both market, social, and government failure—that is, how market imperfections deny disenfranchised people a chance to make the investments needed to rise out of poverty, and why the United States government—is ineffective in making up for this lapse.

One important conclusion emerging from research and facts in this area is the need for sound domestic institutions to promote growth and poverty reduction—more so than a city’s elitism and plutocracy legacy.

 

 

References   [ + ]

1. Economic News Release, Employment and Unemployment Among Youth Summary.
2. http://www.bls.gov/news.release/youth.t02.htm

About Quianna Canada

Quianna Canada is an anti-police brutality activist, author, and opinion writer living in the United States.
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