Welcome to Austin Staffing, Inc.

Austin Staffing Inc.

Austin Staffing Inc.
0.6

Friendly

0/10

    Frequent Assignments

    0/10

      Fair

      0/10

        Would You Do Business With Them Again

        0/10

          Recommend

          0/10

            Pros

            • Small Office

            Cons

            • Unfriendly
            • Doesn't Send Applicant on Assignments
            • Discriminates Against Previously Incarcerated Individuals
            • Owner of the Company is Not Pro-Active
            • Retaliates if You File A Complaint

            Welcome to Austin Staffing, Inc. Not So Welcoming

            When Staffing Firms Retaliate

             

            Welcome to Austin Staffing, Inc., Reviews on Austin Staffing Inc., San Francisco Love Song, Running From Empty Shoes Journal, Quianna Canada

            Welcome to Austin Staffing, Inc. is not so welcoming. Tonight I received a call from Austin Police Department over my exploits in bringing transparency to the staffing firms discrimination. In Reviews on Austin Staffing Inc., I talk about my experience at Austin Staffing, how they violate EEOC standards and the many ways companies like the use police resources to continue to disenfranchise black American people. So their new stunt is saying that I harassed them because I recorded myself asking them questions about the owner. In what way is that harassment? Holding them accountable is not harassment.

            Austin Staffing is retaliating. The EEO laws prohibit punishing job applicants or employees for asserting their rights to be free from employment discrimination including harassment.  Asserting these EEO rights is called “protected activity,” and it can take many forms.  For example, it is unlawful to retaliate against applicants or employees for:

            • filing or being a witness in an EEO charge, complaint, investigation, or lawsuit
            • communicating with a supervisor or manager about employment discrimination, including harassment
            • answering questions during an employer investigation of alleged harassment
            • refusing to follow orders that would result in discrimination
            • resisting sexual advances, or intervening to protect others
            • requesting accommodation of a disability or for a religious practice
            • asking managers or co-workers about salary information to uncover potentially discriminatory wages.

            Participating in a complaint process is protected from retaliation under all circumstances. Other acts to oppose discrimination are protected as long as the employee was acting on a reasonable belief that something in the workplace may violate EEO laws, even if he or she did not use legal terminology to describe it.

            Engaging in EEO activity, however, does not shield an employee from all discipline or discharge. Employers are free to discipline or terminate workers if motivated by non-retaliatory and non-discriminatory reasons that would otherwise result in such consequences.  However, an employer is not allowed to do anything in response to EEO activity that would discourage someone from resisting or complaining about future discrimination.

            For example, depending on the facts, it could be retaliation if an employer acts because of the employee’s EEO activity to:

            • reprimand the employee or give a performance evaluation that is lower than it should be;
            • transfer the employee to a less desirable position;
            • engage in verbal or physical abuse;
            • threaten to make, or actually make reports to authorities (such as reporting immigration status or contacting the police);
            • increase scrutiny;
            • spread false rumors, treat a family member negatively (for example, cancel a contract with the person’s spouse); or
            • make the person’s work more difficult (for example, punishing an employee for an EEO complaint by purposefully changing his work schedule to conflict with family responsibilities).

            You can read where other people have made valid complaints against them as well here.

            Texas Penal Code § 42.07. Harassment

            (a) A person commits an offense if, with intent to harass, annoy, alarm, abuse, torment, or embarrass another, the person:

            (1) initiates communication and in the course of the communication makes a comment, request, suggestion, or proposal that is obscene;

            (2) threatens, in a manner reasonably likely to alarm the person receiving the threat, to inflict bodily injury on the person or to commit a felony against the person, a member of the person’s family or household, or the person’s property;

            (3) conveys, in a manner reasonably likely to alarm the person receiving the report, a false report, which is known by the conveyor to be false, that another person has suffered death or serious bodily injury;

            (4) causes the telephone of another to ring repeatedly or makes repeated telephone communications anonymously or in a manner reasonably likely to harass, annoy, alarm, abuse, torment, embarrass, or offend another;

            (5) makes a telephone call and intentionally fails to hang up or disengage the connection;

            (6) knowingly permits a telephone under the person’s control to be used by another to commit an offense under this section; or

            (7) sends repeated electronic communications in a manner reasonably likely to harass, annoy, alarm, abuse, torment, embarrass, or offend another.

            (b) In this section:

            (1) “Electronic communication” means a transfer of signs, signals, writing, images, sounds, data, or intelligence of any nature transmitted in whole or in part by a wire, radio, electromagnetic, photoelectronic, or photo-optical system. The term includes:

            (A) a communication initiated by electronic mail, instant message, network call, or facsimile machine; and

            (B) a communication made to a pager.

            (2) “Family” and “household” have the meaning assigned by Chapter 71, Family Code.

            (3) “Obscene” means containing a patently offensive description of or a solicitation to commit an ultimate sex act, including sexual intercourse, masturbation, cunnilingus, fellatio, or anilingus, or a description of an excretory function.

             

            About Quianna Canada

            Quianna Canada is an anti-police brutality activist, author, and opinion writer living in the United States.
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            One Comment

            1. I could not} refrain from commenting. Exceptionally well} written! I’ll immediately grab your feed as I can not find your email subscription link or newsletter service. Do you have any? Thanks.

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